Old Trafford Stadium History (part 1)

Old Trafford Stadium History (part 1)

Before 1902, Manchester United was known as Newton Heath, during this time the club’s first players competed at North Road and later Bank Street at Clayton. . However, both have very poor playing conditions, North Road is located between gravel and swamp, while Bank Street is polluted by smog from neighboring factories. So after rescuing the club from bankruptcy in 1909, the new club president John Henry Davies decided that Bank Street Stadium was not suitable for a team that had won the First Division and the FA Cup. Therefore, he gave the club some money to build a new stadium. Not wanting his money to be wasted, Davies consulted the terrain around Manchester, before buying a piece of land adjacent to the Bridgewater Canal, located at the north end of Warwick Road, Old Trafford.

Starting in 1909, Old Trafford was completed in 1910 with a total construction cost of up to 60,000 pounds. It became the new home of the Club and replaced the old Bank Street stadium in Clayton. The football field was designed by the talented Scottish architect, Archibald Leitch, who also built other famous English schools such as Hampden Park, Ibrox, and White Hart Lane. However, due to the increased start costs, it is expected to cost an additional £ 30,000 over the original estimate, according to the proposal of Club Manager JJ Bentley the capacity of the yard will be reduced to about 80,000 spectators. fake.

In the years 1911 and 1915, Old Trafford was the venue for the FA Cup Final. It was a match that saw around 58,000 people. On December 27, 1920, Old Trafford Stadium hit the record for the greatest number of spectators in World War II. It was a match with an audience of about 70 504 people.

In 1939, the stadium attracted a record audience of 76 962 people who watched the FA Cup semi-final between Grimsby and Portsmouth. During World War II (1939-1945), Old Trafford was severely damaged by the air bombing of Nazi Germany. United’s first match at Old Trafford after the end of the Second World War on 24 August 1949 was attended by 41 748 spectators.